Napo Wildlife Center, Yasuni National Park, Amazon, Ecuador

nubbsgalore:

photos of aldelie (2,5,7,8) and chinstrap (1,3,4,6) penguins by (click pic) tim laman, ralph lee hopkins, justin hoffman, franz lanting, michael poliza and maria stenzel.

both chinstrap and adele penguins rely on krill for food, but the krill population, which itself relies on phytoplankton found beneath icebergs, has decreased by 80 percent. as the antarctic ice continues to melt, the phytoplankton are prevented from accessing cold water nutrients found beneath the icebergs, which ends up putting populations of the penguins at risk.  

there’s now strong evidence to suggest a more than 50 percent drop in the abundance of chinstraps breeding since 1986, while the adelie population northeast of the ross sea has declined by 90 percent.

(side note: the bluer ice seen here is created as air bubbles trapped in the ice are sufficiently compressed over time from accumulated snow so that they no longer interfere with the passage of light. the structure of glacial ice, different from the ice you would normally see, strongly scatters light, which, as with all ice, is blue because water absorbs photons from the red end of the visible spectrum much better than the blue end.)  

(Reblogged from we-are-star-stuff)

americasgreatoutdoors:

Gold season continues with aspens starting to change above the dunes in Great Sand Dunes National Park!

NPS/Patrick Myers 2014

(Reblogged from coloradonature)
think-progress:


"It’s not controversial to say that human activity is contributing in some way. The question is how serious that is" - Bobby Jindal, Governor of Louisiana 

Turns out pretty serious for your state.

think-progress:

"It’s not controversial to say that human activity is contributing in some way. The question is how serious that is" - Bobby Jindal, Governor of Louisiana

Turns out pretty serious for your state.

(Reblogged from think-progress)
ucresearch:

The Slingjaw Wrasse
Peter Wainwright is a fish biologist at UC Davis and studies the many ways fish eat their food.  His lab has a YouTube page that shows an array of fish eating their prey. In the animation above the slingjaw wrasse essentially creates a suction tube to eat small fish by unhinging its jaw.

ucresearch:

The Slingjaw Wrasse

Peter Wainwright is a fish biologist at UC Davis and studies the many ways fish eat their food.  His lab has a YouTube page that shows an array of fish eating their prey. In the animation above the slingjaw wrasse essentially creates a suction tube to eat small fish by unhinging its jaw.

(Reblogged from ucresearch)
(Reblogged from motherboardtv)

discoverynews:

Sea Urchin-Inspired House Captures Tidal Energy

If you’ve ever dreamed of having a seafront home shaped like a sea urchin — who hasn’t? — then hold onto your swim fins.

The Hydroelectric Tidal House, envisioned by architectural designer Margot Krasojević, draws inspiration from some of nature’s weirdest sea creatures — echinoderms like starfish and sea urchins whose symmetrical shapes have long fascinated biologists. Learn more

(Reblogged from discoverynews)

s-c-i-guy:

600 Million Years and Counting…

I was pretty bored so I decided to make some GIFs of the last 600 million years of our planet’s plate tectonics.

The first GIF is a global mollewide projection. The second one is of the Colorado Plateau and the North American Southwest. The next GIF is of the entire formation of the North American Continent. The fourth GIF is of geologic and tectonic evolution of Europe. And finally the last one is the same as the first except in rectangular format.

I obtained the images from Global Paleogeography and them compiled them one by one into Photoshop with the end result being the above GIFs.

Geology rocks

(Reblogged from we-are-star-stuff)

Job opportunities

coloradonature:

If anyone knows of any I am in the market for one. I have a degree in History/Archaeology but will take just about anything at this point. Message me if you can help.

(Reblogged from coloradonature)

mypubliclands:

The majestic South Fork of the Snake River flows 66 miles across southeastern Idaho, through high mountain valleys, rugged canyons, and broad flood plains to its confluence with the Henry’s Fork near Menan Buttes. One-third of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem’s bald eagles share the air space here with 179 bird species, including 21 raptor species.  

In the waters pictured here, the largest population of native Yellowstone cutthroat trout outside of Yellowstone National Park swims the clear river channels. One of the largest wildlife-rich, cottonwood gallery forests remaining in the lower 48 states is found here. The region also provides crucial winter range for deer, elk and other big game. 

So far, willing land owners have exchanged, sold or donated about 90 private properties to help conserve lands along the South Fork of the Snake River. Many of these were working farms and ranches intermingled with public lands. This has provided some 27,000 acres to help consolidate public lands and enhance the ecological integrity of an area under increasing development pressure. This work also adds tangible value for the more than half a million people who come here each year to fish, boat, camp, hike, watch wildlife or simply enjoy the area’s stunning natural beauty and cultural richness.

CLICK HERE to read Wild Water Conservation- a feature article by Jessica Gottlieb in the BLM’s My Public Lands Magazine, Summer 2014

(Reblogged from mypubliclands)

Water Wells Contaminated in Colorado. Homeowners Wonder if Fracking is to Blame. http://h2oradio.org/75650.html

The Raton Basin which straddles the Colorado/New Mexico border has seen intense natural gas drilling and production in the past two decades. In 2008, a homeowner near Trinidad, Colorado, who was having his water well tested learned that it was contaminated by a chemical known as “Tert-butyl alcohol” or “TBA.”

TBA is a man-made substance found in many household items such as shampoos, cosmetics, shellac, paint removers— and can be a byproduct of a chemical used in hydraulic fracturing.

So how did this chemical get underground and into well water? That’s an unsolved mystery that has perplexed state agencies and left frustrated homeowners in this rural area: high, dry and overwhelmed.

(Reblogged from discoverynews)
(Reblogged from coloradonature)
breakingnews:

At least 180 dead in monsoon flooding in Nepal, India
AP: The death toll from three days of flooding and torrential rain in Nepal and India has increased to more than 180 people, local officials said Monday.
Western Nepal and northern India are the worst-hit regions where floodwaters brought on by monsoon season have submerged hundreds of villages.
Photo: This Sunday, Aug. 17, 2014 aerial photo shows houses in a residential area partially submerged by monsoon floods at Nalanda district of Bihar, India. (AP Photo/Press Trust of India)

breakingnews:

At least 180 dead in monsoon flooding in Nepal, India

AP: The death toll from three days of flooding and torrential rain in Nepal and India has increased to more than 180 people, local officials said Monday.

Western Nepal and northern India are the worst-hit regions where floodwaters brought on by monsoon season have submerged hundreds of villages.

Photo: This Sunday, Aug. 17, 2014 aerial photo shows houses in a residential area partially submerged by monsoon floods at Nalanda district of Bihar, India. (AP Photo/Press Trust of India)

(Reblogged from breakingnews)

jtotheizzoe:

smartereveryday:

Have you ever been stung by a jellyfish? Want to know what was actually happening? First ever footage (that I’ve seen) of an actual jellyfish sting in microscopic slow motion. Check it out! 

This makes at least two times that Destin has captured something that no one has ever seen before via YouTube (here’s the other). We live in amazing times, eh?

Next time you look at a jelly, venomous or otherwise, I hope you carry a bit of awe with you. Remember, even the most basic creatures are products of hundreds of millions of years of intricate natural selection and evolution, and their simplicity should not take away from their wonder.

(Reblogged from jtotheizzoe)